Design Bloggers share their interiors advice in BDDW in New York’s SoHo

This week ACHICA Living has been on #BlogTourNYC, visiting The Big Apple to check out the delights and bright lights-big city of the New York Design Festival. Blog Tour is the brainchild of Modenus founder Veronika Miller and involves bringing a team of ‘15 influential design and lifestyle bloggers to cities where they’re immersed in the latest exhibitions’, with a view to reporting back all the latest finds worldwide.

With an action-packed itinerary, we’ve relentlessly explored the city that never sleeps for the latest in design. And it’s great to see that #BlogTourNYC has been ‘trending’ on Twitter. ACHICA Living has been lucky enough to go behind the scenes at designer-du-decade Jonathan Adler’s headquarters in SoHo (what a friendly and fun team!), mingled at the DIFFA Dining By Design show cocktail party and GPS’d our way around the Architectural Digest Home Design Show 2012 to discover the hottest new designers. Full reports coming soon. In the meantime, check out BDDW…

ACHICA Living and #BlogTourNYC  were invited to hang out in BDDW, which is one of New York’s hottest furniture stores in SoHo. Founded by head designer Tyler Hays, a painter and sculptor, BDDW is a small American furniture company with a large imagination. It’s ‘dedicated 
to the creation of well-crafted timeless design,’ and beautiful pieces it has in its store too. It’s known for its traditionally joined solid-wood furniture including beds, tables, seating, lamps and storage and is a seriously cool place to visit – highly recommended if you’re ever in NYC. They even have an indoor archery set up for staff and host archery competitions once a month with fellow designers in the neighbourhood. Which company can say that?

Last night over a ginger cocktail, carrot truffle cake and spot of indoor archery, ACHICA Living asked each fellow design blogger from #BlogTourNYC to share their top design tip to report back exclusively here on ACHICA Living. Here’s what they have to say…

Katie Treggiden from Confessions Of A Design Geek

“Do what you love, not what’s in vogue or what you think other people will love. I feel that your home should be an expression of your personality – it should tell the story of your life.”

Carol King from Dear Designer

‘To create a clean looking finish, always add a touch of black to every room. It stops neutral schemes from looking bland, adds a refreshing contrast and grounds the look.’

Arianna Trapani from Arianna Interiors

“Spacial planning is important – it affects the way people behave in a room. If the space is too cluttered, people won’t be able to relax. Think of the flow of the room and how you walk around it  - clear away any major obstructions.”

Veronika Miller from Modenus

‘Keep it simple and don’t overthink. Look for plain walls and curate a great selection of unique pieces that defines who you are. These could be a light fixture, a great piece of art or a rug on the wall.’

Cecy J from Cecy J Life + Style blog

‘If your room is looking tired, use the accessories you have with precision. I like to fold and tuck a throw down the centre of my sofa and add two cushions either side to give it a lift each season. Tablecloths are inexpensive and can be used at the end of a bed to add colour to your bedroom.’

Tim Bogan from Modenus

‘The history of design is important, so when buying a piece of furniture know your history. It’s about modifying the piece to your own environment, so understand how each piece of furniture was intended to be used.’

Tamara Stephenson from Nest By Tamara

“Don’t try and do up your home all in one go. Let it happen naturally over time. Don’t give yourself time constraints otherwise the results will feel forced.”

Will Taylor from Bright Bazaar

“My best tip for those afraid to start using colour is to layer. Instead of worrying about painting a whole wall or investing in large furniture, layer it up with smaller pieces such as cushions and soft furnishings.”

Toma Clark Haines from The Antiques Diva

“The key to interesting interiors lies in the juxtaposition of old and new. If you take an over the top Baroque gilt chair and pair it with an uber modern white glass table then both elements will play off one another, each appearing better because of their contrasts. In decorating the best interiors include a blend of old and new, precious and pop, bright and matt.”

Mollie Magill from The New Traditionalist

‘Mix woods with interesting finishes with bold and textural leather. Our newest design is a bright orange leather tufted bar stool with a metallic oak and people were obsessing about it at the Architectural Digest Home Show this week!’

Stacey Sheppard interior architecture and design blog

‘Don’t follow trends just because they are popular right now. Instead, take the elements of the trends that resonate with you personally and use them to create a design that you will be happy with further down the line. A big huge feature wall in tangerine tango may seem like a great idea now, but will you still love it in two years time?’

Stacey Bewkes from Quintessence

“Ensure every room in the house has a mirror to bring it to life. Place the mirror adjacent to the window to reflect the light and create a sense of space.’

Marilyn Russell from Design Magnifique

“Layers, layers and more layers. Don’t be afraid of infusing a mixture of patterns, colours and textures in your space in one full swoop. While all these design elements need to be harmonious, they will also give your space interest and movement, thereby leaving you wanting more. A space should provoke your senses upon entry.”

Andrew Dunning from APD Interiors

“Keep your interior fluid, as opposed to static. Keep it fresh by moving things around in your home – even from room to room. Don’t just decorate a room and consider it finished, otherwise it will tire and become boring.”

Leslie Carothers from TK Partnership

“If you have an open space and you want to create more rooms within the space without spending a lot of money, use different types of lighting to create pools of light to delineate the functions of the room.”

Kelly Morisseau from Kelly’s Kitchen Sync

‘There are no standard sizes anymore, so always read the small print on your appliance specifications very carefully. Think about the ergonomics in your kitchen and how much room you have around your appliances for them, and you, to ‘breathe’.’

Kate Baxter from Fabric of my Life

“Don’t be afraid to mix and match old and new – brights and neutrals. Find inexpensive statement pieces in car boot fairs – get there early and grab whatever catches your eye first.”

David John of YHBHS

“I like to mix historical pieces with modern. The one thing I believe is splurging on good lighting as it’s one of the most important aspects of a room.’’

Hannah Coleman of Dreamwall Style

‘Use vertical stripes on the wall to add height to your room, possibly just on one feature wall. Stick to natural finishes – I love Piet Hein Eek wallpapers, which depict wooden vertical slats. Simply beautiful.’

Emily Peck – that’s me from ACHICA Living folks! Pictured on the right, with Mollie Magill from The New Traditionalist on the left.

My top tip? ‘Glass accessories look wonderful in a room. Cloches in particular are the perfect display tool. Use them to store candles or objet d’art to create a beautiful centrepiece for your dining table. Or, group together a selection of vases in different shapes and designs, and colours, to create an eye-catching statement in a corner, or centre, of your room. All in all – have fun with your interior space – it’s there to be enjoyed!’

Follow ACHICA on Twitter here and Blogtour – #BlogTourNYC

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Emily Peck, Editor

View all posts by Emily Peck, Editor